Manitoba Landlords Association

Welcome to the MBLA for Small Business Landlords

The Manitoba Landlords Association (MBLA) and its sister organization The Canada Landlords Association (CLA) are leading provincial and national organizations for private small residential landlords. We provide a unified voice for private landlords and promote and protect our members' interests to national and local government.

  • Network with top professionals
  • Get advice from experienced landlords
  • Learn how the Landlord and Tenant Board works
  • Meet our recommended partners
  • Take part in landlord activities, social events.
  • A chance to "get involved!"

Manitoba Landlords Can Now Run Premium TVS Credit Checks For Only $10/Check By Joining the Manitoba Landlords Association!

TVS credit check Manitoba landlords association membership

The Manitoba Landlords Association is proud to announce Manitoba Landlords can join the MBLA for only a low one-time registration fee and get lots of tools and services including the Manitoba Landlord Rental Kit.

Now Members can begin running credit checks on your potential tenants with TVS for only $10/Check!

This is a huge savings for Manitoba Landlords Association Members!

You get access to TVS credit checks at a huge discounted price!

TVS credit checks provide you with a credit score and even a recommendation on whether you should rent to a potential tenant or not.

It’s a deal that can’t be beat for Manitoba landlords!

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How Much Can Manitoba Landlords Raise the Rent in 2015?

Manitoba landlord rent increase 2015

The rent increase guideline for 2015 is 2.4%

New regulations passed earlier this year also strengthen requirements for exemptions from the rent regulation when landlords make renovations, and will limit how often landlords can apply for those exemptions. The changes will also spread the cost of some improvements over a longer period, which could result in smaller rent increases.

The rent guideline applies to most residential rental properties, including apartments, single rooms, houses and duplexes.

It does not apply to units renting for $1,435 or more per month as of Dec. 31, 2014; personal care homes; non-profit housing with subsidized rent; approved rehabilitated rental units; and new buildings that are less than 15 years old, where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit first occupied after April 9, 2001, or less than 20 years old, where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit first occupied after March 7, 2005.

About 1,000 more properties will be protected from large rent increases, Lemieux said in a statement.

He also said the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Winnipeg in 2014 is $751, compared with $888 in Regina, $1,087 in Calgary and $1,050 in Toronto. The average rent for a two-bedroom apartment in Winnipeg in 2014 is $969, compared with $1,053 in Regina, $1,267 in Calgary and $1,241 in Toronto.

Landlords can apply for an increase above the guideline if they can show the guideline will not cover cost increases they have incurred.

Tenants must receive written notice of a rent increase at least three months before the increase takes effect. For example, for a rent increase to take effect Jan. 1, 2015, tenants must receive notice by Sept. 30. With few exceptions, rent can only be increased once a year.

Tenants have the right to object to any rent increase. Objections must be filed at least 60 days before the rent increase is set to take effect.

2015 Rent-increase guidelines set at 2.4 per cent

 

 

Manitoba’s rent guideline for next year has been set at 2.4 per cent, the province said today.

 

Consumer Protection Minister Ron Lemieux said the increase is based on the consumer price index and is within the Bank of Canada’s inflation-control target range.

 

New regulations passed earlier this year also strengthen requirements for exemptions from the rent regulation when landlords make renovations, and will limit how often landlords can apply for those exemptions. The changes will also spread the cost of some improvements over a longer period, which could result in smaller rent increases.

 

The rent guideline applies to most residential rental properties, including apartments, single rooms, houses and duplexes.

 

It does not apply to units renting for $1,435 or more per month as of Dec. 31, 2014; personal care homes; non-profit housing with subsidized rent; approved rehabilitated rental units; and new buildings that are less than 15 years old, where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit first occupied after April 9, 2001, or less than 20 years old, where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit first occupied after March 7, 2005.

 

About 1,000 more properties will be protected from large rent increases, Lemieux said in a statement.

 

He also said the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Winnipeg in 2014 is $751, compared with $888 in Regina, $1,087 in Calgary and $1,050 in Toronto. The average rent for a two-bedroom apartment in Winnipeg in 2014 is $969, compared with $1,053 in Regina, $1,267 in Calgary and $1,241 in Toronto.

 

Landlords can apply for an increase above the guideline if they can show the guideline will not cover cost increases they have incurred.

 

Tenants must receive written notice of a rent increase at least three months before the increase takes effect. For example, for a rent increase to take effect Jan. 1, 2015, tenants must receive notice by Sept. 30. With few exceptions, rent can only be increased once a year.

 

Tenants have the right to object to any rent increase. Objections must be filed at least 60 days before the rent increase is set to take effect.

 

New Rules For Notices for Manitoba Landlords

Manitoba landlords new rules

Manitoba landlords should we knowledgeable about the new rules from the Residential Tenancies Branch regarding the length of time for notices to tenants.

For more details see the Winnipeg landlords website.

Landlords will have to follow new rules for notices including the following:

1. If he Landlord Decides They Want To Move Into the Rental

2. If The Landlord Wants to Renovate the Rental Property and Believes the Tenant

    Can’t Stay While the Work Is Being Completed

3. If The Landlord plans to Demolish the Rental Property

4. When The Landlord Will Convert the Unit From a Residential Rental Property to Something Different.

Make sure you contact the Residential Tenancies Branch for more information regarding the change in notice rules.

http://blog.tenantverification.com/tips/updated-notice-requirements-for-manitoba-landlords/

http://blog.tenantverification.com/tips/updated-notice-requirements-for-manitoba-landlords/

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Manitoba Landlords: Rent Increase Guideline 2014

Manitoba landlords 2014

How Much Can Manitoba Landlords Raise the Rent in 2014?

We’ve received lots of emails from landlords across Manitoba in December.

Landlords across the province are facing difficult tenant challenges and increased costs.

They want to know how much they can raise the rent in 2014.

One Winnipeg landlord emailed in saying:

“My last tenant left with rent owing and the place was a mess costing me over $5000. I rented out to new renters last year for a low price. She has now brought in several ‘friends’ to live with her and my utility costs are going through the roof? Can I raise her rent to cover my additional expenses?”

Another landlord from Brandon wrote in:

“I’m a new landlord and trying to be professional and caring. The problem is the wear and tear from my tenants is often excessive. They say they don’t mean to cause damages and I believe them. It’s just I’ve had to spend hundreds of dollars for new windows and new appliances that are suddenly always broken. What can I do?”

Rent Control In Manitoba

Alberta landlords can raise the rent as much as they want for their renters because the provincial government doesn’t control how much landlords can raise the rent.

Manitoba landlords face rent control which means the government controls the rent in our province.

This is the same as what BC landlords face (they can raise the rent 2.2% in 2014) and what Ontario landlords deal with each year (Ontario landlords can only raise the rent 0.8% in 2014 and they aren’t happy about it!)

How Much Can Manitoba Landlords Raise the Rent in 2014?

The 2014 rent increase guideline for Manitoba landlords is 2.0 per cent, effective Jan. 1, 2014.

Under the Residential Tenancies Act, tenants must be given proper written notice at least three months before the rent increase takes effect.

A notice to increase rent must meet the requirements of The Residential Tenancies Act. The branch provides rent increase forms for landlords to use. In most circumstances, rents can only be increased once a year. The guideline applies to rented residential apartments, single rooms, houses and duplexes.

According to a statement from the Manitoba Residential Tenancies Branch, there are some exceptions to the guideline. These are:

1. Premises renting for $1,395.00 or more per month as of Dec. 31, 2013

2. Personal care homes

3. Approved rehabilitated rental units

4. New buildings less than fifteen years old where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit was first occupied after April 9th, 2001

5. New buildings less than twenty years old where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit was first occupied after March 7th, 2005.

What If Tenants Disagree With the Rent Increase?

Manitoba tenants can object to any increase in rent regardless of whether it is at, below or above the guideline.

Landlords can apply for a larger increase if they can demonstrate that the guideline amount will not cover cost increases they have incurred.

For more information on how to legally raise the rent in 2014 go to  the Manitoba Residential Tenancies Branch.

 

The 2014 rent increase guideline for Manitoba landlords is 2.0 per cent, effective Jan. 1, 2014.

Under the Residential Tenancies Act, tenants must be given proper written notice at least three months before the rent increase takes effect. A notice to increase rent must meet the requirements of The Residential Tenancies Act. The branch provides rent increase forms for landlords to use. In most circumstances, rents can only be increased once a year. The guideline applies to rented residential apartments, single rooms, houses and duplexes.

According to a statement from the Manitoba Residential Tenancies Branch, there are some exceptions to the guideline. These are:

Premises renting for $1,395.00 or more per month as of Dec. 31, 2013;

Personal care homes;

Approved rehabilitated rental units;

New buildings less than 15 years old where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit was first occupied after April 9, 2001; and

New buildings less than 20 years old where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit was first occupied after March 7, 2005.

Manitoba tenants can object to any increase in rent regardless of whether it is at, below or above the guideline. Landlords can apply for a larger increase if they can demonstrate that the guideline amount will not cover cost increases they have incurred.

For more information, visit the Manitoba Residential Tenancies Branch at http://www.gov.mb.ca/cca/rtb/.

Jan 1 Manitoba Landlords: How Much Can I Raise the Rent 2014?

 Manitoba landlords rent increase 2014

Manitoba Sets Rent Increases for 2014

The 2014 rent increase guideline for Manitoba landlords is 2.0 per cent, effective Jan. 1, 2014.

Under the Residential Tenancies Act, tenants must be given proper written notice at least three months before the rent increase takes effect. A notice to increase rent must meet the requirements of The Residential Tenancies Act. The branch provides rent increase forms for landlords to use. In most circumstances, rents can only be increased once a year. The guideline applies to rented residential apartments, single rooms, houses and duplexes.

According to a statement from the Manitoba Residential Tenancies Branch, there are some exceptions to the guideline. These are:

Premises renting for $1,395.00 or more per month as of Dec. 31, 2013;

Personal care homes;

Approved rehabilitated rental units;

New buildings less than 15 years old where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit was first occupied after April 9, 2001; and

New buildings less than 20 years old where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit was first occupied after March 7, 2005.

Manitoba tenants can object to any increase in rent regardless of whether it is at, below or above the guideline. Landlords can apply for a larger increase if they can demonstrate that the guideline amount will not cover cost increases they have incurred.

For more information, visit the Manitoba Residential Tenancies Branch at http://www.gov.mb.ca/cca/rtb/.

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