Posts Tagged ‘Landlord forum’

Tenant Screening Manitoba: Tenant Credit Checks

Sunday, November 3rd, 2013

 November 3rd, 2013

Manitoba landlords tenant credit checks

Tenant Screening Including Tenant Credit Checks Is the Key For Success

Small residential Manitoba landlords are being treated unfairly.

You only need to look at the ridiculous allowable rent increase guideline for 2014 which is set at 2 percent.

Where’s the Media for Small Landlords?

The only story that received much media attention recently was about heating in large buildings.

Last month, Winnipeg City Council created fine system for landlords who fail to abide by minimum heat standards

It was a huge story on CBC news.

What Does This Have To Do With Small Landlords?

Very little.

Most small landlords either :

1. Rent Out Their Basement

So of course they will keep on as they share the unit with their tenants

2. Own a Duplex or Triplex or Other Small Unit

They will certainly keep the heat on. Not only for their tenants but for the protection of their rental investment property.

No heat equals frozen pipes and potentially thousands of dollars in needed repairs to fix them.

Where Is the News About Tenants Who Cheat Landlords Out of Rent and Do Damages?

Sadly, the media usually avoids these stories, even though there are so many landlords with these challenges.

Where Is the News For All the Good Small Landlords in Manitoba?

It’s almost non-existent.

It’s politically correct to blame everything on the landlord.

Neither the media or the government will promote or protect small landlords.

Who Represents All the Good Small Landlords Out There?

We’re trying. Help us out.

It isn’t easy with the media against us.

And the old established corporate landlord groups very happy to cooperate with the government.

And who won’t dare really challenge the government policies against landlords.

What Can Landlords Do?

The key is to find good tenants and avoid the Manitoba system.

How Can I Find Good Tenants?

It’s important for landlords all over Manitoba to do proper tenant screening.

This includes tenant credit checks and tenant criminal checks.

How Can I Do a Tenant Credit Check?

Join the Manitoba Landlords Association and you have access to high quality and low cost tenant checks you can do from your own home or office computer in minutes.

Manitoba Landlords Don’t Rely On the Government For Help

Times have changed. The government is not looking out for you!

Tenant screening is the key for success.

Protect yourself. Protect your family.

Protect your rental business!

Join the MLA and start doing premium tenant screening.


Thursday, September 5th, 2013

 September 4, 2013

Manitoba lanldlords 2014 rent increase guideline

Residential landlords all over Manitoba are facing increased pressures these days.

It could be bad tenants or changes in the ways we can legally conduct business (because that’s what we are – business people running a business).

Increased Costs

 We also face increased costs.

 Whether it’s insurance, taxes or the price of hiring good contractors to keep our property safe and attractive, it’s becoming more expensive to be a landlord in Manitoba.

Fortunately we can try to recover our costs by raising rents, right? Many landlords have emailed us saying that at a minimum their costs are rising by 5% each year. We repeat – that’s the MINIMUM. Many landlords have figures which far exceed 5%.

To counter these costs many small and medium residential landlords need to raise the rent. When you include the fact many landlords are being forced to leave their properties vacant if they can’t find a good tenant and a fair rent is more important than ever like in other anti-landlord provinces such as Ontario.

How Much Can You Raise the Rent in 2014?

On a Sleepy End of Summer Friday Afternoon the Government Announced the 2014 Rent Increase

Remember last Friday? Last Friday in August. Start of a long week-end. You had the barbeque ready, friends coming over, and your kids were excited for the last week-end before school.

That was the day the government announced the 2014 Rent Increase Guideline

Here it is in all it’s non-glory:

“Manitoba Healthy Living, Seniors and Consumer Affairs advises the 2014 rent guideline has been set at two per cent and will take effect Jan. 1, 2014.

The guideline is determined annually and takes into account cost increases such as utilities, property taxes and other expenses in the operation of a residential complex.  Manitoba has proposed legislation that would make future calculations as transparent as possible.  It is anticipated a prescribed formula or the consumer price index for Manitoba would be used to help determine the guideline rate.”

That’s right. Only 2%

Landlords can apply for an increase above the guideline if they can show the guideline will not cover cost increases they have incurred. 

Tenants must receive written notice of a rent increase at least three months before the increase takes effect.  For example, for a rent increase to take effect Jan. 1, 2014, tenants must receive notice by Sept. 30, 2013.  With few exceptions, rent can only be increased once a year.

Tenants have the right to object to any rent increase, whether it is below, at or above the guideline. Objections must be made at least 60 days before the rent increase is set to take effect.”

Maybe it’s time all landlords in the province remember this when the next election comes.

To discuss this and other Manitoba landlord and tenant issues go to the Manitoba Landlord Forum.

How About Some Media Coverage Of Winnipeg’s Worst Tenants?

Monday, August 26th, 2013

August 25, 2013

Winnipeg landlords rights

The Winnipeg Free Press had a story about Winnipeg’s worst rental properties.

It’s very common for the media to make landlords (especially small residential landlords) their favourite whipping boy/girl.

We’re only the people who create safe and affordable housing for thousands of renters across Manitoba.

We’re easy to attack.  We don’t have the millions of dollars in resources the large corporate landlords have to hire lawyers and public relations specialists.

We spend our money paying our taxes on time and maintaining our properties in the hope our tenants will stay, pay the rent on time, not damage the rental unit, and maybe even appreciate the risk we take to provide safe and affordable housing. Hey, let’s follow the Ontario model of treating small residential landlords like serfs.

But that’s not sexy.  Stories about good landlords are boring, plain…vanilla in a media world that craves excitement and hits to their website. Who cares if the government creates rules that will lead to less investment and lead good landlords to invest outside the province.

 There was an excellent letter to the Free Press from a landlord’s perspective.

 It surprising it was even published because it was so honest.

Re: Revealing the ‘Peg’s worst homes (July 2). I have been a landlord since 2010 in the North End. I bought two houses, both of which were restored to prime condition. Each time a tenant moved, I had to spend thousands of dollars to restore the home to a livable condition.

I recently sold one of the houses, because I had to spend about $15,000 to restore it. The tenant had called Manitoba Health to complain about the condition of the house. Manitoba Health condemned the house, doing us a huge favour.

They got rid of the tenant legally, where as a landlord, I couldn’t. This house was restored and sold. I now look at stories like this with more open eyes. Is the landlord a slum landlord or is the tenant a slum tenant?

The Free Press writes stories about slum landlords all the time. Don’t you think it’s about time to write about the slum tenant?



To Discuss this and other landlord and tenant issues go to the Manitoba Landlord Forum.