Posts Tagged ‘Winnipeg landlords’

How Much Can Manitoba Landlords Raise the Rent in 2015?

Friday, September 12th, 2014

Manitoba landlord rent increase 2015

The rent increase guideline for 2015 is 2.4%

New regulations passed earlier this year also strengthen requirements for exemptions from the rent regulation when landlords make renovations, and will limit how often landlords can apply for those exemptions. The changes will also spread the cost of some improvements over a longer period, which could result in smaller rent increases.

The rent guideline applies to most residential rental properties, including apartments, single rooms, houses and duplexes.

It does not apply to units renting for $1,435 or more per month as of Dec. 31, 2014; personal care homes; non-profit housing with subsidized rent; approved rehabilitated rental units; and new buildings that are less than 15 years old, where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit first occupied after April 9, 2001, or less than 20 years old, where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit first occupied after March 7, 2005.

About 1,000 more properties will be protected from large rent increases, Lemieux said in a statement.

He also said the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Winnipeg in 2014 is $751, compared with $888 in Regina, $1,087 in Calgary and $1,050 in Toronto. The average rent for a two-bedroom apartment in Winnipeg in 2014 is $969, compared with $1,053 in Regina, $1,267 in Calgary and $1,241 in Toronto.

Landlords can apply for an increase above the guideline if they can show the guideline will not cover cost increases they have incurred.

Tenants must receive written notice of a rent increase at least three months before the increase takes effect. For example, for a rent increase to take effect Jan. 1, 2015, tenants must receive notice by Sept. 30. With few exceptions, rent can only be increased once a year.

Tenants have the right to object to any rent increase. Objections must be filed at least 60 days before the rent increase is set to take effect.

New Rules For Notices for Manitoba Landlords

Sunday, May 11th, 2014

Manitoba landlords new rules

Manitoba landlords should we knowledgeable about the new rules from the Residential Tenancies Branch regarding the length of time for notices to tenants.

For more details see the Winnipeg landlords website.

Landlords will have to follow new rules for notices including the following:

1. If he Landlord Decides They Want To Move Into the Rental

2. If The Landlord Wants to Renovate the Rental Property and Believes the Tenant

    Can’t Stay While the Work Is Being Completed

3. If The Landlord plans to Demolish the Rental Property

4. When The Landlord Will Convert the Unit From a Residential Rental Property to Something Different.

Make sure you contact the Residential Tenancies Branch for more information regarding the change in notice rules.

Manitoba Landlords: Rent Increase Guideline 2014

Wednesday, January 1st, 2014

Manitoba landlords 2014

How Much Can Manitoba Landlords Raise the Rent in 2014?

We’ve received lots of emails from landlords across Manitoba in December.

Landlords across the province are facing difficult tenant challenges and increased costs.

They want to know how much they can raise the rent in 2014.

One Winnipeg landlord emailed in saying:

“My last tenant left with rent owing and the place was a mess costing me over $5000. I rented out to new renters last year for a low price. She has now brought in several ‘friends’ to live with her and my utility costs are going through the roof? Can I raise her rent to cover my additional expenses?”

Another landlord from Brandon wrote in:

“I’m a new landlord and trying to be professional and caring. The problem is the wear and tear from my tenants is often excessive. They say they don’t mean to cause damages and I believe them. It’s just I’ve had to spend hundreds of dollars for new windows and new appliances that are suddenly always broken. What can I do?”

Rent Control In Manitoba

Alberta landlords can raise the rent as much as they want for their renters because the provincial government doesn’t control how much landlords can raise the rent.

Manitoba landlords face rent control which means the government controls the rent in our province.

This is the same as what BC landlords face (they can raise the rent 2.2% in 2014) and what Ontario landlords deal with each year (Ontario landlords can only raise the rent 0.8% in 2014 and they aren’t happy about it!)

How Much Can Manitoba Landlords Raise the Rent in 2014?

The 2014 rent increase guideline for Manitoba landlords is 2.0 per cent, effective Jan. 1, 2014.

Under the Residential Tenancies Act, tenants must be given proper written notice at least three months before the rent increase takes effect.

A notice to increase rent must meet the requirements of The Residential Tenancies Act. The branch provides rent increase forms for landlords to use. In most circumstances, rents can only be increased once a year. The guideline applies to rented residential apartments, single rooms, houses and duplexes.

According to a statement from the Manitoba Residential Tenancies Branch, there are some exceptions to the guideline. These are:

1. Premises renting for $1,395.00 or more per month as of Dec. 31, 2013

2. Personal care homes

3. Approved rehabilitated rental units

4. New buildings less than fifteen years old where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit was first occupied after April 9th, 2001

5. New buildings less than twenty years old where an occupancy permit was first issued or a unit was first occupied after March 7th, 2005.

What If Tenants Disagree With the Rent Increase?

Manitoba tenants can object to any increase in rent regardless of whether it is at, below or above the guideline.

Landlords can apply for a larger increase if they can demonstrate that the guideline amount will not cover cost increases they have incurred.

For more information on how to legally raise the rent in 2014 go to  the Manitoba Residential Tenancies Branch.

Tenant Screening – Avoid Bad Tenants With Credit and Criminal Checks

Saturday, October 5th, 2013

 October 5th, 2013

calgary landlord tenant from hell

It’s Time For Manitoba Landlords To Protect Themselves With Great Tenant Screening (Including Credit Checks and Criminal Checks)

We’ve all heard about landlords facing the challenges of bad tenants before. 

Not only bad tenants, but bad tenants being difficult for good tenants.

While the majority of tenants are good, these bad tenants are everywhere, all over Canada.

This Time It’s Different

We have a big wake-up call for all Manitoba Landlords.

There is now a problem facing landlords that is growing and can be devastating for your rental business.

It could also be a huge disruption and harm you and your family.

Freeman-On-The Land

According to a report at the Ontario Landlords Association Calgary landlord felt like a prisoner after the basement of her rental property was taken over by a Freeman-On-The-Land tenant.

Background

The landlord, Rebekah Caverhill rented out the back half of a duplex she currently owns in the lovely Parkdale area of Calgary to a new tenant in the Autumn of 2011.

She Thought She Rented To a Nice New Tenant

A few months after he moved in the landlord found the tenant had changed the locks.

She saw through the windows the property had been painted black.

CBC news said when she wanted to talk to him he screamed “I am a Freeman on the landlord, this is now my house not yours, the property is now my Embassy!”

He then slammed the door and locked it, using the new locks he set up without permission from the landlord.

He Screamed “It’s Not Your Home Anymore!”

Tenant Screening Is the Key for Success for Manitoba Landlords

Make sure you know who you are renting to before you hand over the key.

The Manitoba Landlords Association offers access to inexpensive credit checks and criminal checks for landlords.

Protect yourself, your family, and your rental property.

Screen Well!

To Discuss This And Other Landlord and Tenant Issues Go to the Manitoba Landlord Forum

PROVINCE ADVISES MANITOBA RENT GUIDELINE SET AT 2% FOR 2014

Thursday, September 5th, 2013

 September 4, 2013

Manitoba lanldlords 2014 rent increase guideline

Residential landlords all over Manitoba are facing increased pressures these days.

It could be bad tenants or changes in the ways we can legally conduct business (because that’s what we are – business people running a business).

Increased Costs

 We also face increased costs.

 Whether it’s insurance, taxes or the price of hiring good contractors to keep our property safe and attractive, it’s becoming more expensive to be a landlord in Manitoba.

Fortunately we can try to recover our costs by raising rents, right? Many landlords have emailed us saying that at a minimum their costs are rising by 5% each year. We repeat – that’s the MINIMUM. Many landlords have figures which far exceed 5%.

To counter these costs many small and medium residential landlords need to raise the rent. When you include the fact many landlords are being forced to leave their properties vacant if they can’t find a good tenant and a fair rent is more important than ever like in other anti-landlord provinces such as Ontario.

How Much Can You Raise the Rent in 2014?

On a Sleepy End of Summer Friday Afternoon the Government Announced the 2014 Rent Increase

Remember last Friday? Last Friday in August. Start of a long week-end. You had the barbeque ready, friends coming over, and your kids were excited for the last week-end before school.

That was the day the government announced the 2014 Rent Increase Guideline

Here it is in all it’s non-glory:

“Manitoba Healthy Living, Seniors and Consumer Affairs advises the 2014 rent guideline has been set at two per cent and will take effect Jan. 1, 2014.

The guideline is determined annually and takes into account cost increases such as utilities, property taxes and other expenses in the operation of a residential complex.  Manitoba has proposed legislation that would make future calculations as transparent as possible.  It is anticipated a prescribed formula or the consumer price index for Manitoba would be used to help determine the guideline rate.”

That’s right. Only 2%

Landlords can apply for an increase above the guideline if they can show the guideline will not cover cost increases they have incurred. 

Tenants must receive written notice of a rent increase at least three months before the increase takes effect.  For example, for a rent increase to take effect Jan. 1, 2014, tenants must receive notice by Sept. 30, 2013.  With few exceptions, rent can only be increased once a year.

Tenants have the right to object to any rent increase, whether it is below, at or above the guideline. Objections must be made at least 60 days before the rent increase is set to take effect.”

Maybe it’s time all landlords in the province remember this when the next election comes.

To discuss this and other Manitoba landlord and tenant issues go to the Manitoba Landlord Forum.

Winnipeg Renter Meeting

Thursday, July 4th, 2013

 July 3, 2013

Winnipeg Renters

Are you a renter in Winnipeg with questions? If you are there is a Renter Meeting for you with the Residential Tenancy Branch and the City by-law department presenting.

For example, have you ever asked yourself the following:

1.    Can you stop paying rent if repairs aren’t completed?

You know, if you broke the door or the fridge.

2.    What can you do if you find bedbugs and your landlord doesn’t spray?

Shouldn’t the landlord be responsible for bedbugs, even if they are brought in by tenants.

3.    What qualifies the apartment you rent as being condemned?

If you don’t take out the garbage or clean up the yard could it lead to you having to actually move out.

4.    When is it right to call the City by-law department?

Do you only do this after you have been evicted?

5.    If I call the Residential Tenancy Branch will I be evicted?

You’ve heard about all that spying in the United States. Has the landlord bugged your phone?

All your questions will be answered July 4th, 2013 at the big meeting.

Presenters will include the Residential Tenancy Branch and the Winnipeg By-law and Enforcement Office.

If you are a Winnipeg landlord you can arrange your own meeting. After all, landlords are all raking in the money by running slums and ripping off tenants, right?

Or does the government want to portray hard-working small landlords that way. They seem to think small landlords don’t face challenges.

Small landlords who, in reality, create high quality, affordable housing for thousands of people in our city.

Small landlords who increasingly have to deal with tenants who don’t pay rent and don’t respect our properties.

Small landlords who are true stake-holders in the economic growth of our province.

Maybe the government should hold a meeting for us showing their appreciation of what we do.